Monday, 7 April 2014

What's happening in the Garden

Harvesting from the garden


The autumn garden is providing much abundance 


The biggest buzz is our first ever chestnut tree has 8 chestnuts on it in its very first season.
 It was planted on top of our  beloved Caro cat so she sure is giving it her blessing.


The walnut tree tripled production in its second year - Ali we will catch up to you soon on the walnut count. SMILE.

 The passionfruit vine once again is producing a bumper crop - we all love eating passionfruit to eat so none get preserved for another day instead we totally get into eating by the season and devour them.

Cape gooseberries we have to eat before Mack the dog does, he just loves these. They are fun to snack on while walking past. I pulled many out last year as they got a tad wild but they reappeared in different plots so will let them stay put.


Feijoas another fruit all our family love and the counting of how many each of us is allowed goes on. I do want to plant more of these.

 Keifer lime tree was saved thankfully - the new sheep got out and all were munching on it.



Talking sheep Tup has done the deed and we should expect little lambs around 28th August.

 We are still getting corn

Yet to harvest over this month


 Kumera - sure hope we have a bumper crop.one never knows until the digging begins.


oranges


Crab apples - I was gutted when went to check on the crab apple tree we have gathered from in our community to see someone had pruned it back hard and incorrectly - the tree is dying I just about cried - our family has soo many wonderful memories going a gathering to this spot.


My very first persimmon on the permission tree. I wonder if it is planted in a good spot as hasn't thrived. I also want to plant more of these trees as I sure love persimmons.


Kiwi's eat your heart out I read growing pomegranates is extremely hard and we will have to agree this is the ripest a pomegranate has ever grown here. Usually they rot on the tree. But with our long dry season we may just get some pomegranates to actually eat. Fingers crossed.

To do in the garden over the month.


finish saving the poppy seeds.


Once the tomatoes have finished - which isn't far away to pull out the plants and start aggressively building up the soil. I've mustard seeds to sow - but been waiting for the rain as ground is soo dry. . Collecting sheep poop to put on the beds. Then some newspaper and pea straw to tuck the beds up for winter. so this rest of the month I will be busy just working on feeding the soil. Gathering leaves to build up the compost piles
I've said I'm not going to plant a winter garden this year - more work on the soil but I am hanging out for some kale so we will see....


Oh and the autumn crocus are blooming - such joyful little flowers.


Linking up to the Garden Share Collective and Mosaic Monday.

24 comments:

  1. Beautiful Busy Bountiful times Leanne! Funny with the persimmons. I put in 2 trees about 7 years ago, side bu side; one has fruited every year - about 2-3 fruit each time, and the other just grew and grew but never any fruit. This year that one has about 12 on it and the other one has its usual 2-3!! Go figure! My pomegranite has fruit again this year too squeal, I thought last year was a fluke.

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    1. fussy fruits aye - but oooh so delish!

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  2. Our feijoas are just starting to fall, cape gooseberry are all finished, tomatoes pulled out, bean seeds saved, but your passionfruit,, we cannot grow them here. My Dad on our farm at TeHihi had a plant, or maybe more, huge, about 7 feet tall, I could climb under it, and find all the empty skins, where he had an ample snack on the way to the cowshed!! You photo brought back wonderful memories of those days. Cheers, Jean.

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    1. my beans are still on the vine for saving getting nice and fat. I need to plant another passionfruit tree as I read they don;t live forever and ever SOB as ours is a beauty. Love Leanne

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  3. wow...what an abundance. and so many of my favorite things. i would die for those passion fruits! i love persimmons and pomegranates might be my most favorite fruit. walnuts! i remember when i was a little girl, we would sit around the table for ours shelling walnuts to bake with. i just planted the first of my spring flowers!

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    1. I saw passinfruit in the supermarkets and thought of you - next time I'll weigh one and let you know how much they are selling for. I've to plant my spring bulbs in a few weeks.

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  4. nothing like gathering your own food that you have grown. I too am going to leave my garden this year how do you protect your crops from white butterfly I have covered our garden with netting but they have still destroyed all my brassicas.

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    1. I put my glasses on and get out there and SQUISH the eggs with my fingers - any caterpillars I find are killed. I'm rather savage aye. It seems weird but its very therapeutic and I get into a meditative state.. . I'm anti sprays. Love Leanne

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  5. You have a wonderful assortment of fruit and nut trees. I always found with cape gooseberries that they preferred to grow where self sown. I tried planting some in the actual garden but they were not happy whereas they grew naturally all over the property.

    We weren't going to try persimmon but came across a grower selling some spare plants. We put three (different varieties) in our sandy soil in the north and they did so well that we were selling them.

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    1. Some friends here grew persimmons and their tree was amazing so I'm sure we can grow them - just wonder if the plant is in wrong spot as the tamarillo tree isn't doing any good either.

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  6. Wow! What a crop. We have a big persimmon tree, not planted by us, by the previous owners. I had never in my life tried one, until the other day, they are really nice! Our tree is groaning under the weight, look like we will be sharing them around...too many for us.
    I love the look of the poppy heads, they are standing to attention!

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    1. I eat them like an apple and could eat them for breakfast, lunch and tea.Shame I don;t live closer to you!

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  7. What wonderful autumn riches! I too love persimmons, and always get excited when the season begins.

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    1. I'm starting to enjoy autumn more rather than regretting summer is over and I do think it from gardening and harvesting. Love Leanne

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  8. Thats a pretty good effort to get a pomegranate growing. I would not of thought they would grow over there either. Looks like you have plenty of fruit in your garden, I am still waiting for my trees all to get established. Look forward to seeing you garden after you have applied sheep poo. I get alpaca poo from my folks which is great for the fruit trees.

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    1. It's amazing taking all the photos as I think we normally see all what has to be done. By stopping and taking photos we actually get to pause and SEE just how much we do get done. Thanks for the challenge I'm hooked. Love Leanne

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  9. Wow, what a fabulously bountiful year. I'm giggling about Mack and the Cape gooseberries, Big Bill loves the strawberries.

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    1. Mack loves strawberries and we have to look down driveway for the passionfruit every morning before he gets out as he loves them too. (They roll down the driveway)

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    1. Thanks it is awesome providing the fruit for the packed lunches each morning from what we have grown. Big BUZZ. Love Leanne

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  11. Wonderful fruits and nuts! You do have some exotic sounding fruit, I have never heard of. Love the sheep, lovely shot.. Thanks for sharing, have a happy week ahead!

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    1. Thanks it's awesome harvesting and snapping a photo to remind us that all our hard work is paying off. Love Leanne

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  12. Hi Leanne, your garden harvest looks lovely! Oh I wish I could grow cape gooseberries. Love to snack on them and they get to be so expensive here in the Pacific Northwest. They are slightly more affordable in England, but I'm only there for half the year. Hope your week is off to a wonderful start. :)

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    1. I've never seen cape gooseberries for sale in the shops over here.

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