Tuesday, 24 September 2013

Eating off our land


 Pretty thrilling a double yoke goose egg

 If we had let Gus and Geraldine have babies they would of had twins.

 A goose egg pavalova - rather flat as I guessed how much egg white I had compared to hens eggs. a bit more sugar and longer beating time would of been better. It still tasted like a pavlova just flat and yes it did run off my tray into my oven...But I thought I was pretty inventive using goose eggs.

Rhubarb stewed for pudding along with goose egg pavlova. One gets inventive for desert with family members who don't eat egg. and dairy. -I had to find something they could eat - stewed rhubarb

 It's pretty lean picking in the garden at beginning of spring , I often think how hard it must of been for pioneers to raise food for their families. Not much is happening in the garden at the moment  but I managed to pick kale, broccoli stalks and broad bean tops.

 A walk around garden finding herbs to  flavour a rooster. I did pop in the pot also onion, celery and carrot a bit of a cheat when it is meant to be only a meal from what we have grown.

 Rooster fat - wow very yellow wonderful stuff. Yellow coloured fat is natural and more nutritious than the white stuff you see on shop bought poultry . The rooster had a good diet and it shows in the yellow fat just as the hens egg yolks are a rich golden orangey yellow. I melted the fat down and cooked our roasted potatoes in it.

Prince the rooster didn't fit in my biggest stock pot.... I pushed him in , made him fit and then as I put hot water on him and his legs popped up. Talk about screams and tears in the kitchen.
I so wish he had been a nice rooster like my old much loved Rory rooster who lived for 14 years.

I slow boiled him - shredded the white meat for dinner everyone said he was really nice
I couldn't eat him. I just couldn't - my portion went in Mack's dinner bowl

I know it is mind over matter

The family are teasing me like hell saying I am all talk!

It is quite a mind shift to look your dinner in the eye. However I am concerned and passionate about our food source and wish to know where our food has come from that I am serving my family. I want to know the animal or plant has been raised well and healthy.

Raising ones own food is hard work not just physically but also emotionally. 

I will keep trying.



18 comments:

  1. if i had to look my food in the eye i couldn't eat it either. i am trying so hard to find a farm that i can go to and buy my eggs and meat.

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    1. On last nights news in New Zealand it shared how banned allergy-causing preservative is in meat. Family members and I are very allergic to sulphites and sulphur dioxide. I can't even drink red wine (bugger) due to these. It is being put into our meat. Friggen shocking. http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/banned-allergy-causing-preservative-found-in-meat-5590313

      It has made me get determined to carry on and raise our own meat and get over myself.
      Love leanne

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  2. I think you are doing really well!

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    1. I'll keep trying, being very passionate about where our food comes especially with the sulphites and sulphur dioxide being put in our supermarket meat. http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/banned-allergy-causing-preservative-found-in-meat-5590313
      Love Leanne

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  3. Oh, you had me laughing out loud when I read about the rooster's legs popping up in the kettle! I could not raise and then eat my own meat, but then again, if I were hungry enough I'd probably get over it fast. I've had duck eggs, but never goose eggs. They must be huge and make a wonderful meal! Yours look extremely healthy.

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    1. I do find it very hard. But I am making myself get over it really fast - especially as I research and learn what is going into the food chain.
      I will keep trying.
      Love Leanne

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  4. I bet Mack enjoyed your share more than you would have! Love the double yolker, the best thing about having your own poultry is the beautiful bright yellow yolks...

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    1. Sure can tell a shop egg to a home grown egg... but some farmers feed their chicken calendula to give the yolks and meat the orange colour - ricks of the trade.
      All of the animals and visiting cats got to finish off Prince the rooster.Naming an animal to eat is not a good idea - but we had no idea he was going to turn out soo nasty - our last rooster was a much loved pet for 14 years.
      Love Leanne

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  5. Sorry I hooted with laughter too - I could just visualize what happened with the rooster legs.

    You touched on a subject I often think about. How did previous generations have enough food during the lean times of year or when some disaster happened to their crops? We all know what happened in Ireland of course - they died by the 1000s.
    This time of year would be lean for us. We have lots of silverbeet and herbs. A few broccoli and a small cabbage. Loads of walnuts frozen and some as yet unshelled. Macadamia nuts just coming ready. Oranges now just sweet enough ( 30 trees ) and lemons and kiwifruit still edible. Avocados daily eaten. We of course have the luxury of a deep freeze with tomatoes, pesto etc from when we had plenty. But that is a modern thing. SO I guess we could almost survive if we had to but it would be a restricted diet. If we really desired meat we R could shoot the odd rabbit we could eat the quail( NO! ) and pheasants. I have just realised we would not starve.

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    1. Prince the rooster got the last laugh. I had put him in the fridge still in stock water thinking I'd make chicken soup and stock. OH MY when I went to prepare him he was sumerged in yellow glugy fat. A lesson learnt. He had the last laugh as spattered me with his fat. YUCK I sure dislike that rooster! He ended up dinner for the dogs, cats and guest cats, so not wasted.

      We sure wish we had planted more fruit trees and nut tress when we first moved here. If we do move it will be to an established food garden like yours.

      Love Leanne
      PS I have 2 bunnies in bottom paddock that the boys are telling me they are waiting for them to get fat... if those bunnies eat my spring garden I will be very cross. Got to learn to use my gun I do.

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  6. That must have been such a shock! We have not eaten ours yet but butchering time is almost here. I'll see how it goes but I don't really have a choice, too many to keep in our area and most are likely roosters.

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    1. Good luck - it is much easier if they are not named. Prince was goign to have a forever home here but he was the nastiest rooster one has ever met. A mean fella - such a shame.
      Love Leanne

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  7. Oh I'm laughing about your old rooster Prince - for a 'not the fave rooster' in the world he sure was fat so you obviously looked after him! I'm sure he will reward you by tasting good!!!

    I've never had a goose egg (to my knowledge) but I bought goose fat once to roast the Christmas veges and they were the best we've ever eaten!!
    What rewards you're getting from your farm animals Leeanne.

    Shane

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    1. Hi Shane - I'm so far behind blog reading I hope to visit you today at morning tea time.
      We do love animals - anything for the pot such as lambs... do not get named, we know they are for the pot and they get a good life here until the deed is done. Prince was meant to of been a pet but he was soo aggressive he needed to go - the hens are pleased and we are too. He was awful to his girls, have his way with them then keep them in a corner, wouldn't let them eat and then really go us with his spurs flying when we entered the coop to clean or change water. Went us in the garden too. PUNK!

      Love Leanne

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  8. Leanne, I think I would be the same and wouldn't have been able to eat Prince either. Glad that everyone else got to enjoy him.

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    1. I did find it hard - the family teased me awful. I thought oh I don't want to do this again and then on last nights news was all about what they are putting in our meat. My big girl pants are back on and I will keep going.
      Love Leanne

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  9. Well done on using the goose eggs on the pav. Don't worry too much about the rooster, I'm sure if was a matter of survival we would be better at it. At least the family had a good feed.

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    1. I think we could provide well for ourselves. I've plans for another vege garden to go in - had hoped it would be this year but I don't think I've the time with study. Maybe once I finish homeschooling.
      Love leanne

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